About this site

  • Comments
    When you submit a comment, it won't be published until approved. This is to cut down on comment spam. However, I will also edit or block comments that are profane or offensive.
  • No Legal Advice
    Although I may from time to time discuss legal issues on this blog, nothing that I post should be construed as legal advice, nor as creating an attorney-client relationship between you and me. In fact, there's a good chance I'm not licensed to practice law wherever you are. If you need legal advice, you should consult an attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.
  • Personal View
    This blog is neither affiliated with my employer nor hosted by it. It is maintained through TypePad, and I pay the hosting fees. Nothing that is posted here should be construed as anything other than the views of the particular author of the post.
  • Tung Yin's Recent Papers (SSRN)

April 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
    1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30      

Stats


  • Check Google Page Rank

« Delicious irony? | Main | Pryor on abortion, judging »

June 24, 2005

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d834522c6369e200d8344ae03253ef

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Federal capital case in Vermont:

Comments

JJ

As someone who is generally in favor of the death penalty, I have to say that you make a great point.

I think that the death penalty should be a last means, ultima ratio punishment. Timothy McVeigh most certainly deserved to die, and so does Bin Laden. The guy in the article, well, I generally tend to err on the side of caution, and hence, no capital punishment unless there's a really good reason.

I don't know all the facts so I'd prefer to reserve judgement. But if the DA *and* the victim's family was okay with life w/o parole, then I see no reason to override the plea and push for the death penalty. If the family specifically asked for it - that's another story.

Andrew Winters

I agree with what most of the original poster has to say. The only thing I wanted to note is that Vermont doesn't even have the death penalty. It was only the sheer circumstance that the two kidnappers drove the victim over state lines that enabled Ashcroft to get his greedy little hands on the man's life.

The comments to this entry are closed.